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SPACE WEATHER AURORAS

Introduction

The amazing, colorful, and dancing auroras we see from time-to-time are the result of incoming energy and particles from the sun.

NASA informs us that energy and solar particles leave the sun periodically; this energy and the solar particles can take two to three days to arrive at Earth. Quite a trip! Once they do arrive, though, our upper atmosphere reacts with them. The reaction includes oxygen and nitrogen molecules releasing myriad photons of light. This then, causes the so-called Northern and Southern lights.1 Cool, eh?

According to NASA, auroras are part of "a larger space weather system in which solar material and radiation can affect Earth's own magnetic environment and block radio communications, disturb onboard satellite computers, or — at their worst — cause electrical surges in power grids."2

Aurora's Over Earth Gallery

NASA produced a really sweet Aurora's Over Earth gallery series on Flickr.

Simply click on the following title to go to NASA's Aurora's Over Earth gallery. Click the 'back arrow' in your web browser to return here.

Aurora Videos

Video 1:

The following video is a little over two minutes long. It is entitled Mystery of the Aurora.

Video 2:

The following NASA produced video is a tad shy of five minutes long. It is entitled Space Weather and Earth's Aurora.

Video 3:

The following NASA produced video is a little over three minutes long. It is entitled Earth's Auroras.

Video 4:

The following NASA produced video is a little over three minutes long. It is entitled Aurora Australis as seen from space.

Video 5:

The following NASA produced video is a little over three minutes long. It is an educational video entitled Aurora Borealis as seen from space.

Go to NASA for more wonderful videos about space weather.

Now . . . let's take a little tour into the realm of:

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